Things That Might Go Click With Me

I have to admit that my mind is a bit of a swirl right now. It’s hard to explain why yet, but perhaps I am dropping hints below. Or I am just summarizing three interesting reading materials that I recently pored through.

Tanya Golash-Boza. “Writing a Literature Review: Six Steps to Get You from Start to FinishWiley Exchanges (2015).

Golash-Boza lists steps to help dissertation writers organize and write their literature reviews. The post summarizes the literature review section of Sonja Foss and William Walters’ book Destination Dissertation: A Traveler’s Guide to a Done Dissertation.

Katherine Brown and Chris Hensman (editors). “Data Driven Public Diplomacy: Progress Towards Measuring the Impact of Public Diplomacy and International Broadcasting Activities (PDF)” U.S. Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy: Reports (2014).

The U.S. Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy report names five areas of public diplomacy evaluation at the U.S. Department of State and the Broadcasting Board of Governors that need to be changed and makes recommendations on how to modernize and systemize evaluation in those areas.

Kylie Hutchinson. “The Demise of the Lengthy Report.” AEA365 (2017).

Hutchinson describes how “layering” (her term) data into different types of reporting formats, such as newsletters, infographics, presentations, et cetera, can expland the value of data, extend its reach, and replace an ominous final report. The post is a bit of a promo of Hutchinson’s new book, but it also succinctly encourages you to think about different ways to present your data to different audiences.

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Where Do I Begin?

Here is as clear a mission statement for this blog as you are going to get:

Delimiter Z will explore how librarians use data to understand audiences and improve services.

What does that specifically mean? I don’t know. We’ll see.

To start, I’ve written brief summaries of a few articles and reports that have been influential in my work over the past six months or so.

Pip Christie. “Are Librarians Becoming Data Analysts?Vable (2016).

Christie points to potential opportunities librarians have to market themselves as data analysts and discusses ways to use data analysis tools to one’s advantage. Useful from the perspective of identifying ways librarians can put their skills to use in new ways.

Mahesh Kelkar, et al. “Data-driven Decision Making In Government.” Deloitte Center for Government Insights (2016).

A team from Deloitte Center for Government Insights describes best practices in U.S. government data-driven decision-making and outlines techniques government offices can use to improve their analytics capabilities. Really nice report that offers a thoughtful road map for building program evaluation capacity.

Bill Pardi. “If You Want to Be Creative, Don’t Be Data Driven.” Microsoft Design (2017).

Pardi discusses potential problems with being too reliant on data to drive decision-making. Reminiscent of Darrell Huff’s “How to Lie with Statistics.”